Forums Article Discussion Size and competition

5 replies, 4 voices Last updated by  tucsonbear 2 weeks, 6 days ago
Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
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  • #3197

    scottwkelley
    Participant
    @scottwkelley

    I am at a spot where the stone size being asked for of 10 mm is going to hurt. I have no rough to meet this. My sizes are small and large. Why do we have a size restrictions when I see the IFC doesn’t care. It’s all about the cut. Clarity is important in our competition but doesn’t seem to be judged. So why is size. I cut to get the most out of my rough and it is killing me to sacrifice material to meet a requirement of size. The stone predicts so much to what can be done. I understand I can cut glass but that is not what I work with. Anyone else feel restricted by set sizes? If that is the case maybe we need a competition to creating two identical cuts and size for those ear pieces. I find that to be a challenge when dealing with natural rough.

    #3198

    Alan Balmer
    Keymaster
    @alanbalmer

    Scott, the ability to cut to a precise size is one of the skills being tested by the competition. As noted, there’s no requirement to use expensive material. This year’s competition does call for topaz, a relatively inexpensive material, for one stone, but the others are synthetics.

    #3263

    gemmakermz
    Participant
    @gemmakermz

    Scott, Alan i can see the ruling for meeting size, this is a jeweler standardizing. but today we are talking amateur and pro faceting. i worked for pacific test specialties/ crystalite whom pioneered the plated diamond metal bonded lap, this was during the 70’s and the faceting took off like a bullet. it is kind of fading out now do to the high prices of the machines and availability of good material. i teach faceting for free and after teaching some one to cut a standard cut i then tell them to cut the stones to what the stone dictates from its structure. size doesn’t matter. you can go to any jewelry trades supply place and buy their standard poor cut sized stones cheap, I’ve done so. its the none standardized stones that are of value. a custom cut stone with an appropriate mounting is far more valuable. and the material is terrible out there. in 70’s i got material you cant get now unless you own a bank. i believe new adjustments to cutting rules may be warranted. being able to work with flaws and skillfully hiding them etc.. to me its the skill of getting out of a stone the most, impressive possible and cleanest possible, stone you can get and getting exotic cuts is included. ya Scott i cut for max size too. I’ve cut some outrageous stones too. i like sharing with other faceters trick that many don’t know and I’m not interested in trophies and titles. I’ve been cutting since 1965 and now, at soon to be 77, I’m still at it and teaching. i’m noted only in small private circles. i can only say if your not comfortable with the rules then DO YOUR OWN THING and ENJOY the art of faceting, that’s what its about.

    #3266

    Alan Balmer
    Keymaster
    @alanbalmer

    Sorry, but we’re not talking about cutting for jewelry, we’re taking about a competition which tests the skills of the cutter. It’s for those who are interested in trophies and titles. Precision sizing, precise meetpoints on complex designs, and superb polish are the name of the game. Jewelers are satisfied with stones which wouldn’t do well in the Novice competition.

    In a figure skating competition, it’s not enough to get from one end of the rink to the other without falling down.

    #3475

    tucsonbear
    Participant
    @Tucsonbear

    I have to agree with Alan. I have cut both ways. Imagine a customer brings in a piece of jewelry with a broken or chipped stone, and wants a replacement stone. It’s an heirloom piece from great gramma, and they don’t want the setting changed.

    I also cut to max size, and make jewelry to fit the stone, but being able to cut to a calibrated size is still important.

    #3476

    tucsonbear
    Participant
    @Tucsonbear

    One place I might disagree with competition stone rules is in girdle thickness. I have chipped a few stones in the past while setting them, and consequently, my preference is for thicker girdles. That’s just me.

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